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Infernaeon Interview

A Conversation With Vocalist Brian Werner

By

Infernaeon
Prosthetic Records
The Florida death metal band Infernaeon recently released their debut CD A Symphony Of Suffering. The band’s sound combines the trademark death metal of their home state with a European flavor. Frontman Brian Werner is a former member of Monstrosity. He was very candid about his departure from Monstrosity, Infernaeon’s album, and his dislike of certain genres of music.

Chad Bowar: How did Infernaeon get together?
Brian: The band was formed in 2005 before I was in Monstrosity. We just wanted to jam and play killer metal and eventually evolved into to what we are today. All of us were big fans of our Florida legends but loved the darkness in the Euro stuff so we just decided to combine the two without any idea how it would end up and needless to say we were very happy with the outcome.

How did you decide to have a keyboardist in the band?
Zach Brown is also our producer as well and owns the studio where we recorded. So when we were looking for a keyboardist he was a natural fit. I was always a big fan of Nocturnus so I was all for it. Goes back to what I said earlier about being a big fan of the Euro style and trying to add more atmospherics to the music.

What led to your departure from Monstrosity?
Well I'll be honest - I was fired. Now the terms under which I was fired was pretty shaky. The same day I was fired Sam Molina quit. I'm not going to get into the s*&t talking cause Lee and those guys are still very good friends of mine but there are times in life when you just shouldn't play in a band with your friends. I do see it as a good stepping stone to get to where we are at today and playing in a band with a future instead of a band with history.

What does the band’s name mean?
Technically a reign of 10,000 years of fire. We made it up so it really means that if anyone uses that name they have to pay us.

Briefly describe the concept behind A Symphony Of Suffering.
Well the first two tunes are separate from the last three. The first tune is about the Marquis De Sade, one of my favorite authors. The word sadist was named after him I highly recommend reading “120 Days of Sodom” or “Justine,” two of my favorites. The second tune, "Sleeping God," is a fiction story based on the left-hand path version of the creation story. In spiritual satanism, we belieive in the concept of the seven ancient ones and this entity that has been asleep for 10,000 years is actually their father. And since humanity has only existed for 5,000 years, no one has heard of him and now he's waking up and he's pissed. The album ends with a 3 song trilogy about a prophetic entity who can see the future though the eyes of the dying. So in order to amass more power, he wages a war against the living. The second song of the trilogy goes on to talk about how the victims of the oracle come back to life seeking vengeance against their undead assassins. The trilogy ends with "A.I.D.S.," which stand for Annhilating the Inner Decay of Species which finishes the war.

How did you get Ben Falgoust (Soilent Green, Goatwhore) and Keith DeVito (Obituary, Suffering) to do guest vocals on the album?
Keith was my mentor and taught me how to sing when he was in Pyrexia and pointed me in the right direction and been one of my best friends for several years. Ben actually crashed at my house probably at least 12 times over the years with Soilent Green and Goatwhore when they were on tour. I live in Florida and they come through here all the time. Once we were in the studio doing the album and he was on tour with Soilent Green and he came down at like 4am and laid down the tracks. That guy has one the the sickest voices in extreme metal so we were stoked to get him to do it.

You have a 40 second scream on the album. Did you actually scream for that long, or is it looped?
I actually did. I was able to scream 1 minute and 5 seconds at Monstrosity practice before. Now live, it's a little harder to do when you're running around on stage. Don't get me wrong, I can do it on command and hold 30 second screams live. But in order hit the really long ones it's easier when you're standing still and not all out of breath from headbanging. Plus I smoke a pack a day, that helps the rasp.

What are your expectations for the album?
That's hard to say I just hope real metalheads take to it. All of us have been severely let down by new metal in the last few years so I know there are a lot of people that are skeptical about new stuff. Those are the people who we respect, we are looking for the true metalheads.

What are your upcoming tour plans?
There's talk about us going out with Malevolent this summer as well as Year of Desolation. We have been in touch with some European promoters so we'll probably be heading over there sometime this year as well.

For those unfamiliar with Infernaeon, describe your live shows.
It's constantly changing, especially now we have to worry about the practicality of doing it on the road. When we play here at home we have all the help we need. I have a friend who used to work for Universal Studios and he came out and had all of us all done up in some severe gore that looked sick. Then we would bring this chick out, place here on an altar, slit her throat and disembowel her intestines and all and perform rituals on stage.

The history of Florida death metal is legendary, but how is the current scene there?
The same as everywhere else, some bands draw, others don't. I think people are sick of the Florida legends not taking any risks and trying to do something new. Erik Rutan did it with Hate Eternal, but past that a lot of it is the same stuff rehashed. Now granted, it can be killer, but it's not new anymore. The scene was never that big down here even back in the day. Just the bands were big not the shows. I've seen videos of Morbid Angel from 1989 or 90 and there were still 40 people at the show. I mean now the shows are average size, King Diamond still sells out and bands like Deicide draw like 200 people. But it's coming back in a big way, though local bands draw very well here and people here stand behind our own bands.

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